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Kuehneromyces mutabilis (Schaeff.) Singer & A. H. Sm., 1946

Kuehneromyces mutabilis-Hamoir.jpg <b><i>Kuehneromyces mutabilis</b></i> (Schaeff.) Singer & A.H. Sm., 1946||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/10/31/20151031232258-97a7a00f-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Pholiotta squarrosa</i></b> (Oeder) Kumm. ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/01/20111101155901-a3f0e0e2-th.jpg><b><i>Kuehneromyces mutabilis</b></i> (Schaeff.) Singer & A.H. Sm., 1946||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/10/31/20151031232258-97a7a00f-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Pholiotta squarrosa</i></b> (Oeder) Kumm. ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/01/20111101155901-a3f0e0e2-th.jpg><b><i>Kuehneromyces mutabilis</b></i> (Schaeff.) Singer & A.H. Sm., 1946||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/10/31/20151031232258-97a7a00f-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Pholiotta squarrosa</i></b> (Oeder) Kumm. ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/01/20111101155901-a3f0e0e2-th.jpg><b><i>Kuehneromyces mutabilis</b></i> (Schaeff.) Singer & A.H. Sm., 1946||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/10/31/20151031232258-97a7a00f-th.jpg>Thumbnails<i><b>Pholiotta squarrosa</i></b> (Oeder) Kumm. ||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2011/11/01/20111101155901-a3f0e0e2-th.jpg>

Kuehneromyces mutabilis (Schaeff.) Singer & A. H. Sm., 1946
Family: Strophariaceae
Common names: Sheathed Woodtuft [En], Pholiote changeante [Fr], Stobbezwammetje [Nl], Gemeines Stockschwämmchen [De]

Hamoir, LIEGE ● Belgium

Description: The clustered shiny convex caps are 6-8 cm in diameter. They are very hygrophanous; in a damp state they are shiny and greasy with a deep orange-brown colour towards the rim; often there is a disc of lighter (less sodden) flesh in the middle. In a dry state they are cinnamon-coloured.
The gills are initially light and later cinnamon brown, and are sometimes somewhat decurrent (running down the stem).
The stipe is 8-10 cm long by about 0.5-1 cm in diameter with a ring which separates the bare, smooth light cinnamon upper part from the darker brown shaggily scaly lower part. This type of stem is sometimes described as "booted".

Biology: It is found from April to late October, and also in the remaining winter months where conditions are mild.

Habitat: This species always grows on wood, generally on stumps of broad-leaved trees (especially beech, birch and alder), and rarely on conifers.

Distribution: Kuehneromyces mutabilis is found in Australia, Asia (in the Caucuses, Siberia, and Japan), North America, and Europe. In Europe, it can be found from Southern Europe to Iceland and Scandinavia.

Caution: K. mutabilis cannot be recommended as an edible mushroom as there is a real possibility that it could be confused with the deadly poisonous Galerina marginata. Although a typical K. mutabilis is easily distinguished from a typical G. marginata by the "booted" stipe which is shaggy below the ring, this character is not reliable and G. marginata can also have scales. The main differences are:
• while they are both hygrophanous, K. mutabilis dries from the centre outwards (so having a lighter colour in the centre) and G. marginata dries from the edge inwards,
• the stem below the ring is scaly below the ring in K. mutabilis, but normally fibrously silky in G. marginata,
K. mutabilis has a pleasant mushroom smell and mild taste, whereas G. marginata tastes and smells mealy.

References:
Wikipedia, Kuehneromyces mutabilis



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