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Hypholoma fasciculare Huds. P. Kumm., 1871

Hypholoma fasciculare-Durbuy2.JPG <b><i>Hypholoma fasciculare</b></i> Huds. P. Kumm., 1871||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/11/02/20151102134111-8aafc520-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Hypholoma fasciculare</b></i> Huds. P. Kumm., 1871||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/11/02/20151102183615-5c89a718-th.jpg><b><i>Hypholoma fasciculare</b></i> Huds. P. Kumm., 1871||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/11/02/20151102134111-8aafc520-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Hypholoma fasciculare</b></i> Huds. P. Kumm., 1871||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/11/02/20151102183615-5c89a718-th.jpg><b><i>Hypholoma fasciculare</b></i> Huds. P. Kumm., 1871||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/11/02/20151102134111-8aafc520-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Hypholoma fasciculare</b></i> Huds. P. Kumm., 1871||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/11/02/20151102183615-5c89a718-th.jpg><b><i>Hypholoma fasciculare</b></i> Huds. P. Kumm., 1871||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/11/02/20151102134111-8aafc520-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Hypholoma fasciculare</b></i> Huds. P. Kumm., 1871||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2015/11/02/20151102183615-5c89a718-th.jpg>

Hypholoma fasciculare Huds. P. Kumm., 1871
Common names: Sulphur tuft, Sulfur tuft, Clustered woodlover [En], Hypholome en touffe, Hypholome fasciculé [Fr], Gewone zwavelkop [Nl], Grünblättriger Schwefelkopf [De], Falso chiodino [It], Hifoloma de láminas verdes [Es]

Durbuy, LUXEMBOURG ● Belgium

Description: The hemispherical cap can reach 6 cm diameter. It is smooth and sulphur yellow with an orange-brown centre and whitish margin. The crowded gills are initially yellow but darken to a distinctive green colour as the blackish spores develop on the yellow flesh. It has a purple brown spore print.
The stipe is up to 10 cm tall and 1 cm wide, light yellow, orange-brown below, often with an indistinct ring zone coloured dark by the spores.

Biology: Hypholoma fasciculare grows prolifically in large clumps, anytime from spring to autumn.

Habitat: On the dead wood of both deciduous and coniferous trees, on stumps, dead roots or rotting trunks. It is more commonly found on decaying deciduous wood due to the lower lignin content of this wood relative to coniferous wood.

Distribution: Northern Europe, North America, Iran, Turkey (Eastern Anatolia).

Caution: The sulphur tuft is bitter and poisonous; consuming it can cause vomiting, diarrhea and convulsions. The principal toxic constituents have been named fasciculol E and fasciculol F. Symptoms may be delayed for 5–10 hours after consumption, after which time there may be diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, proteinuria and collapse. Paralysis and impaired vision have been recorded. Symptoms generally resolve over a few days.

References:
Wikipedia, Hypholoma fasciculare
First Nature



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