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Oenanthe cypriaca Homeyer, 1884 ♀

Oenanthe cypriaca-F-Zafer Burnu.jpg <b><i>Serinus serinus</b></i> Linnaeus, 1766 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/02/20/20160220104922-f4915ce3-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Echium angustifolium</b></i> subsp. <i><b>angustifolium</i></b> Mill., 1768||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/02/15/20160215164051-248cf26a-th.jpg><b><i>Serinus serinus</b></i> Linnaeus, 1766 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/02/20/20160220104922-f4915ce3-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Echium angustifolium</b></i> subsp. <i><b>angustifolium</i></b> Mill., 1768||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/02/15/20160215164051-248cf26a-th.jpg><b><i>Serinus serinus</b></i> Linnaeus, 1766 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/02/20/20160220104922-f4915ce3-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Echium angustifolium</b></i> subsp. <i><b>angustifolium</i></b> Mill., 1768||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/02/15/20160215164051-248cf26a-th.jpg><b><i>Serinus serinus</b></i> Linnaeus, 1766 ♀||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/02/20/20160220104922-f4915ce3-th.jpg>Thumbnails<b><i>Echium angustifolium</b></i> subsp. <i><b>angustifolium</i></b> Mill., 1768||<img src=./_datas/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux/i/uploads/t/6/y/t6ynvw9sux//2016/02/15/20160215164051-248cf26a-th.jpg>

Oenanthe cypriaca Homeyer, 1884 ♀
Common names: Cyprus Wheatear, Cyprus Pied Wheatear [En], Traquet de Chypre [Fr], Cyprustapuit [Nl], Zypernschmätzer [De], Monachella di Cipro [It], Collalba Chipriota [Es],
Σκαλιφούρτα [Gr], Kıbrıs Kuyrukkakanı [Tu]

Endemic species

IUCN Status: LC (Least Concern)

Dipkarpaz (Ριζοκάρπασο), İSKELE (Τρίκωμο) ● Cyprus

Description: Small black and white passerine bird, 14–15 cm long. This species closely resembles Pied Wheatear (Oenanthe pleschanka), although it has slightly more black on the tail and back, and on the head. A 2010 study found that Cyprus Wheatear differs from Pied Wheatear in 14 external morphometric characters.
The sexes are similar in appearance, although the female is duller and has more black on the crown.
The song is distinctive, and very different from that of Pied Wheatear, resembling an insect. It consists of a series of high-pitched buzzing bursts.

Biology: The song-perches utilised by this species are high for a wheatear, typically being 5 to 10 metres above ground.

Habitat: It often breeds in woodland habitats, unlike other wheatears (Oliver 1990) suggested that it occupies the ecological niche used elsewhere in the Western Palearctic by the Common Redstart). It is the most arboreal species of wheatear in the western palearctic and it uses often aerial sallying and perch-pounce-feeding tactics.

Distribution: This migratory insectivorous species breeds only in Cyprus. During migration, it can be observed in Near East and North-Eastern Africa: Egypt, Ethiopia, Palestine, Jordan, Sudan, Syria and Turkey.

References:
Wikipedia, Cyprus Wheatear






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